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Random Metal Geology Knowledge

Lithophile elements are those that remain on or close to the surface because they combine readily with oxygen, forming compounds that do not sink into the core.
Chromium, Tungsten and most others to the left on the periodic table (excluding Molybdenum).

Chalcophile elements are those that remain on or close to the surface because they combine readily with sulfur and/or some other chalcogen other than oxygen (which they have a low affinity for), forming compounds which do not sink into the core.
Elements of interest: Silver, Copper, Mercury, Tin, Gallium, Indium, Germanium.

Siderophile elements are the high-density metals which tend to sink into the core because they dissolve readily in iron. Most siderophile elements have practically no affinity for oxygen. Unstable bonds can form with Carbon & Sulphur, more readily forming stable bonds with iron in the dense layer of the Earth’s core where pressures may be high enough to keep the iron solid (not moulten).
Those of interest are: Gold, Silver and the Platinum-group. (yes silver is listed here too).

Obviously seizmic activity; including landslides, tectonic plate divergence then reemergence, volcanics, sea bed silt from land and chalk from sealife(dover cliffs), asteroids, silt from mountains, flooding and tsunami all change this.
But none the less it is interesting, perhaps more applicable to a location with larger relatively stable land mass eg continents; USA, Australia, Siberia.

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